Texas Teen Book Festival Hits Austin on October 7th

Posted October 3, 2017 & filed under Event, News, Press, Student Writing, WITS People.

The Texas Teen Book Festival brings nationally known YA authors from across the nation for readings, writing workshops by WITS’ sister program Badgerdog, and even a literary costume contest. Participants in the FREE event will get to meet Renee Watson, Jason Reynolds, Marie Lu, Adam Silvera, Jennifer Mathieu, and many more.

WITS student Pearl R. is a Houston-based member of the BookPeople Teen Press Corps. Check out this post she’s written to encourage readers and writers to attend the festival in Austin on Saturday.

Calling all writers, readers, and lovers of kiwi!

 

Join us at the Texas Teen Book Festival in Austin, Texas, on October 7th, 2017. Yup, that’s this weekend, so I suggest that you get packing.

You will not want to miss this glorious occasion that The New York Times calls “life-changing and more fun than Wisconsin’s annual cheese-eating contest.”

(Editor’s note: The New York Times never said that and I’m pretty sure we’re going to be sued now.)

This festival features all your favorite YA authors! Some of them came willingly, and some of them we had to smoke out of their houses with firecrackers. We’re going to show these authors some Texas love, which means slathering them in barbecue sauce and putting them on a mechanical bull while they read opening lines from their books. Get ready for some fun!

In addition to lots of readings and book signings, there will be a literary costume contest and free writing workshops. The grand finale will be a Lord of the Flies inspired pig-hunting contest where the winner gets $10,000 cash!

(Editor’s note: This is why we shouldn’t let teens write for our blog. Seriously, I have no idea what this kid was thinking.)

By Pearl R

Houston

Posted September 22, 2017 & filed under Notebook, Poem, Student Writing, WITS People.

Summer melting

into Fall

a perfect morning

letting the wind

wash over you

on the porch.

Lime Ice

reminds you

that the sweaty

days are over.

You enter

the realm

of cool breezes.

Gleeful children

run through

the streets

laughing,

returning home

to dinner,

garden fresh.

 

by Lila, 5th grade

The Shelter of Imagination

Posted September 11, 2017 & filed under Notebook, WITS People.

Meggie with Armoney, age 6,
at George R. Brown Convention Center

Days after Hurricane Harvey made landfall, WITS Program Manager, Meggie Monahan, volunteered at George R. Brown Convention Center, reading, writing, and playing with children who had been displaced by the storm and floodwaters. Meggie reflects on the power of imagination, the generosity of listening, and the resilience of children. Read an excerpt from “The Shelter of Imagination,” which originally aired on KPFT 90.1 FM’s “So, What’s Your Story?”.

When I was a child, our sticky Pennsylvania summers were filled with “make-believe” games. My siblings and I strung stage curtains out of old Sesame Street bed sheets. We wrote new & improved scripts for our favorite Disney movies, and we choreographed music videos for Michael Jackson’s “Dangerous” album. Then one summer, our parents got a new refrigerator. And in the weeks to follow, that huge empty box in the garage became pure and total magic. It was our special hideout: a dark and cool refuge from parents and chores, an escape from mosquitoes, and a ticket to a bigger world.

I haven’t thought about that refrigerator box in a long time. But last week at the George R Brown Convention Center, I recognized it from across the room as Davion and Abu led me by the hand to their special fort. We snaked our way through a sea of cots and blankets and belongings, and there was this beautiful empty box— a space that could be anything at all, anything they wanted it to be. There, smack-dab in the middle of noise and need and exhaustion and loss, these boys had chosen to stand on the shoreline of their imaginations and create a new, more hopeful world.

I came to Houston to study creative writing, and I stayed in Houston because of Writers in the Schools, an organization that believes in the life-saving power of the imagination. We believe that every child has a voice, that every voice is valuable and deserves to be heard— and that the act of sharing our stories is what makes us human, and what connects us to each other. When talking about WITS, I like to say that “wherever kids are, that’s where we want to be,” and that includes inside a cardboard box in the middle of the 4th largest city in the nation.

In the aftermath of Harvey, I’ve had the opportunity to sit with some of our city’s children at the GRB and the NRG and listen to their voices. And it has reminded me and affirmed in me two things: one, that kids are kids wherever they go. And two, that playfulness, imagination, and creativity are trustworthy tools for healing. Even after being displaced by a hurricane, kids want to sit in your lap and wear your sunglasses. They want to pretend to be tigers and practice their super hero moves with you, cover you in stickers, and braid your hair. Most of all, when they believe you are truly listening, kids want to talk. They are natural storytellers, and they want to tell you about their pets and their best friends and their dream vacations, and what they want to be when they grow up. And at WITS, our most important job is to listen— to really listen— and to celebrate and encourage and elevate children’s words at every level.

And that’s what I love about WITS: that we as a community of writers are committed to excavating and elevating the stories of our young people, and emboldening them to use their words to create a more just and beautiful world. And one day these kiddos— the Davions and Abus and Tianas and Bobbies and Anthonys and Nathans and Christiannas and Zias— all of these children are going to tell stories to their children about what happened when it rained for days and days they needed to leave their homes and live in a new and unfamiliar place. And it’s my hope that peppered within their stories and their families’ stories, there might be some small, treasured moments of play, lightness, and getting to be a kid, even in the midst of tragedy.

There is an Irish saying that “it is in the shelter of each other that the people live,” and I would expand upon that by saying, “It is in the stories of each other that the people live.” When we take the time to sit and listen to the story of another person, especially a child, they may not know where to start— but the act of listening is powerful and invites generosity and willingness in the speaker. And when children know they are being listened to, they can’t help but fill empty spaces— air and pages and cardboard boxes— with all kinds of magic. Their giggles bounce across poured concrete floors. Their litanies of favorite foods transform phrases like “shrimp with garlic butter” into prayerful syllables in a crowded convention hall. And their Red Ninja lava super powers are, somehow, enough to defeat the Blue Ninja’s endless waves of water.

Letter from the Director

Posted September 1, 2017 & filed under News, WITS People.

Jarvis, age 5, tells his story, “Batman and Robin Saving People,” through a drawing.

Dear WITS Family,

Finally the rain has ended in Houston. The storm has affected each of us in some way, even those of us lucky enough to avoid flood waters.

After five days of mad precipitation, the deluge transformed into mist and disappeared. That’s when I noticed my Instagram feed was populated with hundreds of sky photos—not dramatic sunsets or hyperbolic clouds, just pale blue sky. Here in Houston, we have never appreciated blue sky as much as we have this week.

When we asked the WITS Writers if they wanted to volunteer to work with flood-affected families, all 30 spots filled in less than an hour. I am humbled to work with such talented, authentic, and generous poets and writers.

Thousands of evacuated families are living in the George R. Brown Convention Center. Although many of the children have experienced trauma, we are not asking them directly about their experience. Instead WITS Writers are bringing joy and playfulness to these kids, telling stories, building houses out of blocks, and pretending to be cars or frogs. As we’ve discovered in the classroom, the stories we most need to share come through, regardless of the subject matter. Humans are storytellers to the core. We connect with one another through language. Through poetry. That’s what makes WITS a powerful part of the healing process.

I have been moved beyond belief by the spirit of generosity demonstrated here in Houston this week. Our Democratic Mayor and our Republican County Commissioner are working as a dynamic duo. It seems as though everyone who remains unscathed is pitching in, helping to feed, clothe, and support those in need. Even the pop radio station that my cynical teens like best has been sharing tales of human kindness, ending with the refrain: “We are all neighbors. We are all family. We are #HoustonStrong.”

Nothing has brought our city together like this moment. It is truly inspiring. It makes me want to work harder than ever to bring the healing power of storytelling to every Houston child.

With love,

Robin

Joshua Nguyen, Robin Reagler, Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Emanualee Bean, and Reyes Ramirez working for Houston’s recovery after Hurricane Harvey.

Revision Strategy #3: Rubber Banding

Posted July 18, 2017 & filed under Notebook, Student Writing, WITS People.

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With younger children, this concrete activity called “Rubber Band Stretching” works well.  Demonstrate how a rubber band starts out small and can be stretched much larger.  Read a simple sentence out loud, and ask for suggestions about how to expand it.  After a student successfully stretches a sentence by adding new words, hand her a rubber band ball.  When a second student stretches the sentence further, the first student passes the ball to the second.  The game continues until it is impossible to stretch the sentence anymore!  Students then apply the lesson to a piece of their own writing.

With older students, the rubber band can be used to discuss sentence length in more complexity. Bring in a strong piece of writing that includes short, medium, and long sentences.  Discuss the various effects.  If you have a geo board, you can actually record or map out the sentences using rubber bands.  Show how the rhythm of a piece changes depending on sentence lengths.

As a spinoff activity, ask students to map out sentence lengths in advance.  Then, try to write a paragraph that fits, and notice how the paragraph sounds.  For older students, it is empowering to see how they can control the rhythm of their piece just through sentence length.

-Marcia Chamberlain, WITS Houston

Analicia Sotelo’s Houston Reading 5/27/17

Posted May 25, 2017 & filed under Event, free Houston event, News, WITS People.

WITS Communications Strategist Analicia Sotelo will read from her new chapbook, Nonstop Godhead, on Friday 7pm at Brazos Bookstore. She will be joined by WITS Board Member Roberto Tejada and WITS Writer Beth Lyons. Nonstop Godhead recently won a fellowship award from the Poetry Society of America. It was selected by Rigoberto Gonzalez. Sotelo’s first full-length book, Virgin, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2018. It is the winner of the Inaugural Jake Adam York Prize.

Happy National Puppy Day

Posted March 23, 2017 & filed under Notebook, WITS People.

On the occasion of National Puppy Day, we thought we’d republish a letter from our Executive Director, Robin Reagler, celebrating all that we love and learn from our pets. It was originally published in the WITS newsletter, A New Leaf, in 2001.

My dog Jake is not a great writer, and yet he has managed to teach me a few important things about how to live my life.

Jake is a foundling. I found him in June on a Sunday afternoon. People were playing baseball in the park. He’d been hit by a car and was limping. He followed me for miles. Maybe I am the foundling. He did find me, in a sense. I was chosen.

That week I was sitting in a 3rd grade classroom in our summer camp. They were sharing news of the day and practicing description. I described (poorly, so as to receive some student assistance) my new puppy.

The next day I received a note from a student in that group, Chelsea, who wrote, “Dear Ms. Robin, Take good care of your puppy.” I have tried my utmost.

As a steadfast puppy observer (severely biased by parenthood) I have abstracted a few wisdoms that I suspect to be the guiding principles of Jake. But first, let me provide a few vital statistics:

Name: Jake

Memorable features: polka dot eyebrows, floppy right ear flops, missing the right hind leg

Age: almost 3

Likes: peanut butter, bones, people food, treats, running like wind, swimming in the bayou, assisting in household chores as the sous chef in the kitchen, jr. gardener in the yard, laundry boy, etc.

Dislikes: taking a bath, his sister Moriah the cat

Nicknames by loved ones: Jacob, J-Chamber, Glow dog, Poco, Poky, Pokemon, Jakomon

Nicknames by strangers: Tripod, Troika, Lucky, Hopalong

And now, Life according to Jake:

  • If you don’t know what something is, smell it. If you still aren’t sure, taste it.
  • When you want something, but someone else has it, ask for it. If that doesn’t work, beg. If THAT doesn’t work, do some tricks.
  • When someone makes you nervous, keep moving. When you have a good feeling about someone, strike up a friendly conversation. If they ignore you, keep moving.
  • Every decision is an everyday decision. If you make a mistake, keep moving.
  • If your people are sick, give them a kiss and stick close by for a while.
  • Joy is everywhere. It is not hiding. It is ours for the taking.

So by the grace of a dog, I keep my eyes and ears open. I try to pay attention to the wonders on either side of my path. The classroom is everywhere.

All my best,

Robin

Send-Off for Meta-Four Team!

Posted July 8, 2016 & filed under Event, free Houston event, News, Student Writing, WITS People.

IMG_5064

Join WITS on Saturday, July 9th, 2 pm as the Meta-Four Houston team gives their FREE farewell performance at the Live Oaks Meeting House on 26th Street in the Heights before jetting off to Washington, D.C. to perform at the Brave New Voices International Festival. Meta-Four Houston recently won first place in the state of Texas. Come check out these talented poets!

Date: July 9, 2016
Time: 2pm
Location: 1318 W 26th St Houston, TX 77008

 

 

Mid-Main Festival Proceeds to Benefit WITS

Posted May 24, 2016 & filed under Event, free Houston event, News, WITS People.

 

mid main 616

 

Spend an evening with WITS on Thursday, June 2nd, 6-10pm for Mid Main’s First Thursday event. There will be live music, performances, art shows, tasty drinks and appetizer specials. A $5 donation will give guests access to the Art Garden and drinks from Topo Chico, St. Arnold, and Deep Eddy. Proceeds will benefit WITS and help us bring the WITS creative writing program to more Houston children!

Location: 3700 Main Street 77002

Cost: FREE

 

Congrats to WITS Writer Jasminne Mendez

Posted February 15, 2016 & filed under Notebook, WITS People.

imgresCongrats to WITS writer Jasminne Mendez for the publication of her new poem “Frijochuelas” in La Galeria Magazine. You can read it HERE.

Jasminne also has a creative non-fiction piece, “El Corte,” that was selected as honorable mention for the Barry Lopez Non Fiction Award through Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts. It will be published in their upcoming The Best of Cutthroat issue. Look for it at AWP!

Last but not least, Jasminne will be one of the featured performers/readers at Brazos Bookstore on March 5th at 2pm for an event called Speak!Poet. Come out and support poetry in the community!

Children’s Book about Poet E.E. Cummings Chosen as One of Best Books of 2015

Posted January 5, 2016 & filed under Notebook, WITS People.

enormoussmallness20Congratulations to poet Matthew Burgess, who read on our WITS panel at AWP in Minneapolis. His delightful children’s book Enormous Smallness chronicles the life of poet, painter, and playwright  E.E. Cummings.

Brain Pickings named Burgess’s book, illustrated by Kris Di Giacomo, as one of the 15 best children’s books of 2015. Very exciting!

Check out all the wonderful choices  at Brain Pickings and order your copy today.

Book Launch on December 11th – Untameable City

Posted December 8, 2015 & filed under free Houston event, Notebook, WITS People.

florek__untameable_city_at_sunsetMutablis Press is celebrating a new anthology of poems about the nature of Houston. The book, edited by Sandi Stromberg, is called Untameable City. Current WITS writers Maryann Gremillion and Sara Cooper are published in it, as well as former WITSers Sarah Cortez, Robin Davidson, Dede Fox, Angélique Jamail, Rebecca Spears, and Randall Watson.

The book launch is Friday, December 11th from 6-9 p.m. at the Jung Center. Reading begins at 6:30.

Nicola Parente Opening on Friday

Posted December 1, 2015 & filed under Event, free Houston event, WITS People.

Join us at Nicola Parente’s artist reception this Friday! We are so excited that Nicola, a longtime WITS supporter and collaborator, will be showing his spectacular paintings in a one-man show.  Gremillion & Co. Fine Art, Houston, TX  is hosting an opening for WITS Artist Nicola Parente on Friday, December 4th at 6 pm. This solo show, No Color Without Light, will be on display at The Annex through January 30th.
nicola show text nicola invite

 

DEEP to Represent Houston

Posted October 5, 2015 & filed under Notebook, WITS People.

6135074_fb_1443213487.0842_fundsWITS Project Coordinator Deborah “D.E.E.P.” Mouton will compete in a national poetry slam in Washington DC this weekend.  Over 70 of the nation’s best poets will compete for the title of 2015 Individual World Poetry Champion, and DEEP will represent Houston. You can help her collect the rest of her expenses by clicking here. Or cheer for her via social media at @LiveLifeDEEP.

Experience “Converse” With Our Own Outspoken Bean!

Posted August 21, 2015 & filed under free Houston event, Notebook, WITS People.

thumb-bean
Converse is an outspoken and comedic interactive theatrical experience based on the life of Emanuellee “Outspoken” Bean, WITS Project Coordinator and Coach of the Meta-Four Houston slam poetry team.

The show is free and will be held on September 9, 16, 23, and 30 at 8:00 p.m. at Dean’s Downtown 316 Main Street, Houston, TX 77002. Come out and converse with Bean!

Summer at WITS: Lessons Learned

Posted July 23, 2015 & filed under WITS People.

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In 2013, I began my freshman year at Rice University and had no idea what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wanted to study history and do something positive for the world, but did not need frequent reminders from my Mechanical Engineering-focused friends to know that the job market is weak for history majors focused on social justice. I had spent the previous two summers working as a camp counselor, and knew that I loved working with and mentoring kids. After an information session with the Rice Teacher Education department, my career goal hit me like a ton of bricks: I would be a high school history teacher. Since then, I have been extremely focused on my teaching goals. Through the noble subject of history, I will give my students the inspiration and education needed to overcome structural inequality, achieve their educational and career dreams, and become activists for social justice in their communities. I probably take myself too seriously.

In pursuit of my teaching goals, I’ve spent the past eight weeks as a Writers in the Schools intern, observing writers and teachers in classrooms and workshops, teaching lessons myself, and assisting with camp logistics. As a prospective teacher, I was excited for the chance to improve my teaching, classroom management, and lesson planning through this internship. While my practical teaching abilities did improve this summer, my experiences with WITS most notably improved my perspective and attitude towards education.

While preparing to be a teacher, I have heard plenty of horror stories about dysfunctional schools suffering from internal strife, unreasonable administrators, overwhelmed teachers, and unmotivated students. Many of the best educators I have met stress the serious nature of their mission, struggling heroically against the socio-economic forces and lack of resources that reduce educational opportunity for students in urban public schools. While I try to focus on the positive when envisioning my future in education, I too fall into the trap of emphasizing the obstacles I will face as a public school teacher in Houston. We get lost in arguments about STAAR testing, funding inequities, and charter schools and forget that the subjects of these disagreements are children.

At WITS summer camps, I was able to forget the baggage surrounding education and enjoy learning alongside the students. WITS teachers write, sing, and act with their students, creating a classroom culture of joy and creativity. Given a safe space to take risks with their ideas, kids quickly blossom into authors with the ability to be silly and serious. First graders dance around with excitement about the play they are writing starring a talking pink ocelot. Awkward, quiet middle schoolers turn into confident poetry performers. Without the pressure of standardized testing, teachers can focus on nurturing a love of reading and writing, a positive classroom atmosphere, and step-by-step improvement in academic skills. To create this educational environment, WITS educators share lesson plans, plan curriculum together, and frequently teach as a team.

My grandiose big-picture goals of changing students’ lives and changing the world through my teaching remain. However, my WITS internship taught me that I must focus on the basics of what education should be: fascinating, joyful, and collaborative. If I focus on the big picture only, I will be overwhelmed. If I concentrate on creating a positive classroom culture like that found in a WITS classroom, I know my larger teaching goals will take care of themselves.

By Joel Thompson

Joel Thompson was an Educational Marketing Intern at WITS in 2015, sponsored by the Shell Nonprofit Internship Program. He will be a junior at Rice University this fall.

Summer Fun with Andy Roo

Posted June 9, 2015 & filed under free Houston event, Notebook, WITS People.

andy roo artWITS Writer Andrew Karnavas has a secret life. Shhhhhhhhh.

He will be doing a Kid’s Variety Show on the 2nd Saturday of each month this summer at Phoenicia. You can attend his show and then move on the the free WITS Writing  workshop at Discovery Green at 10:30.

Here’s more information from the Andrew’s (Any Roo’s) website:

MKT BAR at Phoenicia Specialty Foods Downtown is hosting a FREE summer series for kids! The first-ever MKT BAR Saturday Morning Kid’s Variety Show will be geared toward children ages 4 and up (and the young at heart), and will take place every second Saturday this summer: June 13, July 11 and August 8 from 9 to 10:30 a.m.

This family-friendly series, sponsored by Sessions Music with a portion of proceeds benefiting Artbridge Houston, will feature live music, magic and more from local children’s musician AndyRoo & the AndyRooniverse—who takes audiences on an adventure through the AndyRooniverse—and Houston-based magician David Rangel. There will also be special guest performances that aren’t just for kids—they’re by kids. Other activities will include crafts, coloring, drawing, creative writing and YUMMY! cookie decorating.

Attendees who pre-register will receive a free goody bag filled with YUMMY! treats, and door prizes will be provided courtesy of Children’s Museum of Houston. Refreshments such as breakfast bites, coffee, tea, juices and soft drinks will be available for purchase.

Admission is FREE with advance registration at AndyRoo.eventbrite.com, and free customer parking is available in the One Park Place garage on a first-come, first-served basis. **PLEASE NOTE** Joining this event does not guarantee entry. You must register for entry and the goody bag on Eventbrite.

The series is generously sponsored by Sessions Music, a revolutionary, new concept dedicated to helping people of all ages and skill levels achieve their modern and classical music dreams. Through an emphasis on individualized curriculum, performance opportunities, and state-of-the-art technology, Sessions Music provides a novel and superior approach to music education at three conveniently located music studios in the Houston area.

Writers’ Conference April 10th & 11th in Houston!

Posted April 10, 2015 & filed under Event, News, WITS People.

Register TODAY for HBU’s 3rd annual Writers’ Conference in Houston, Texas

April 10 & 11, 2015 on the campus of Houston Baptist University

WITS Writers Elizabeth Keel, Dulcie David, and Maryann Gremillion with Sandra Campbell from Houston Grand Opera will present dynamic, interactive workshops on Saturday. 

Cairns_Scott

Keynote Address:

An Evening with Scott Cairns: A Reading and a Yammering

Friday, April 10, 7:00 pm, at Belin Chapel on the campus of Houston Baptist University.

In this address, Scott Cairns — Guggenheim fellow, Dennis Levertov Award recipient, librettist, anthologist, and multi-award-winning author of numerous books of poetry and nonfiction — will read a selection of his work and talk about the writer’s/artist’s vocation.

 

See Register NOW! Page

  • Standard Registration is $35, which includes lunch Saturday.
  • Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Registration is $75, which includes lunch Saturday and 5.25 Continuing Professional Education hours.
  • HBU Students, Faculty, and Staff Registration is free – lunch is not included with the HBU-affiliate registration.

Complimentary notebooks, pens, coffee, tea, and water will be provided for everyone.

Individuals are responsible to reserve their own accommodations. Please see the Hotel Information link for more information.

 

Original post: March 13, 2015