Letters to the Sun

Posted July 12, 2013 & filed under Notebook.

 

Summer Sun

The Heat is very hot and scorching,
causing drought and sweat.
Weeds and caterpillar grass are
drooping and then dying.
It is so hot!
You are playing around
and not caring about us!

By Olivia

Heat
Heat, heat
it is moist.
Sweating, sweating,
It makes you hot.

By Ryan

Dear Sun
O sun, your heat disappoints many.
Instead of singing, the birds
Are probably just yelling at you.
O sun, my skin is blazing in flames.
I get sunburns, so even inside,
I blaze in flames.

O sun, you make me tired and thirsty.
And don’t even get started on my eyes –
They burn and get tired of squinting
and blinking quickly.

O sun, black must be your favorite color.
No wonder you burn us!

By Grace

(Photo by Dan E. Johnson via Flickr)

Child Authors

Posted May 11, 2011 & filed under Notebook.

When our daughter turned 4 years old, we signed her up for the Summer Creative Writing Workshops sponsored by Writers in the Schools and Rice University’s School Literacy & Culture Project. Carrie wasn’t really “writing” at all when she started camp, but she was bursting with energy and ideas. By the end of camp, she had amassed, through dictation and scribbling and drawing, a stunning portfolio of stories and poems and illustrations. She announced to anyone who would listen, “I’m a writer.” And she was.

If you have a young child and you’re looking for a wonderful summer literacy experience, please visit our website to sign up for summer writing camp. You may be nurturing the next Hilda Conkling!

Hilda Conkling started writing poetry daily when she was just four years old. Her mother, a teacher at Smith College, began sending Hilda’s poems to magazines and when she was 10, she had one hundred poems collected and published entitled Poems by a Little Girl.

by Marcia Chamberlain, Writers in the Schools

Letters to the Sun

Posted July 22, 2010 & filed under Notebook.

 

During the WITS Summer Creative Writing Workshops held June 7 – June 25th, students from Charlotte Schneider and Mischa Enos’ third and fourth graders wrote poems about the sun and heat, expressing their strong feelings about Houston’s unique summer climate. You can feel the mercury rise with each word!

Summer Sun
The Heat is very hot and scorching,
causing drought and sweat.
Weeds and caterpillar grass are
drooping and then dying.
It is so hot!
You are playing around
and not caring about us!

By Olivia

Heat
Heat, heat
it is moist.
Sweating, sweating,
It makes you hot.

By Ryan

Dear Sun
O sun, your heat disappoints many.
Instead of singing, the birds
Are probably just yelling at you.
O sun, my skin is blazing in flames.
I get sunburns, so even inside,
I blaze in flames.

O sun, you make me tired and thirsty.
And don’t even get started on my eyes –
They burn and get tired of squinting
and blinking quickly.

O sun, black must be your favorite color.
No wonder you burn us!

By Grace

(Photo by Dan E. Johnson via Flickr)

Summer Camp Registration Opens Today!

Posted February 1, 2010 & filed under Notebook.

Registration for our Summer Creative Writing Workshops in now open online. Students grades Pre-Kindergarten through 12th grade can attend this unique three week workshop, now offered at 5 locations in the Houston area. This collaboration between Writers in the Schools and Rice University’s School Literacy and Culture Project has been named “Best Summer Program for Kids” by the Houston Press.
Click here for more information, or if you’re ready to register, click here.

WITS Students Featured in the Houston Chronicle

Posted June 18, 2009 & filed under Notebook.

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Students attending the Summer Creative Writing Workshops recently visited The Menil Collection for inspiration.  The Houston Chronicle decided to come along and bear witness to the creative process in action.  Photographer, R. Clayton McKee, caught some tremendous shots of students and their teachers as they discussed and contemplated famous works of art.  Click here to see the slideshow.

The Summer Creative Writing Workshops are a collaboration between Writers in the Schools (WITS) and Rice University’s School Literacy and Culture Project.

Photo Credit: R. Clayton McKee